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Mar

1

What exactly in the Poetic Edda is Christian?

What exactly in the Poetic Edda is Christian? How do you know it’s Christian? People like to say that the Eddas were “rewritten” by Christians, or that they have “Christian influence”. That statement is only half-true. There are two Eddas. The Poetic Edda, consisting of authentic heathen poems, and the Prose Edda, written by Snorri

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Mar

1

The judgement on each one dead

THE DOOM OF THE NORNS: THE JUDGEMENT ON EACH ONE DEAD In the Norse sources, death is often spoken of as norna dómr, norna sköp, or norna kviðr —“the judgment of the Norns.” Their doom is inescapable. Because Snorri does not mention one, many have assumed that the Norse religion lacked a judgement seat for

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Feb

25

The horned man and the ravens

The Horned Man and the Ravens This image in particular is of interest: It is a drawing of a fragment of tweezers from Ihre Gotland, which appear to depict energy rising from the crown of the head and manifesting as ravens [i.e. Hugin and Munin, Thought and Memory] Fjolsvinsmal 45 calls them “wise ravens” Horskir

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Feb

15

The journey of the Dead Part 3

Excerpt from VIKTOR RYDBERG’S “OUR FATHERS’ GODSAGA” Translated by William P. Reaves © 2003 Chapter 38. Part 3 / 3 THE NORNS. THE JUDGEMENT ON THE DEAD. THE PLACES OF BLISS AND PUNISHMENT. – original title – …. A drink is also prepared for the damned, but it is blended with poison, painful to swallow

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Feb

14

The journey of the Dead. Part 1

Excerpt from VIKTOR RYDBERG’S “OUR FATHERS’ GODSAGA” Translated by William P. Reaves © 2003 Chapter 38. Part 1 / 3 THE NORNS. THE JUDGEMENT ON THE DEAD. THE PLACES OF BLISS AND PUNISHMENT. – original title – Urd, the dis of fate, is also the dis of death. Because she determines every human’s fortune and

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Feb

9

Loki bound

Although he had once been adopted into the circle of gods, as a blood-brother by oath of Odin himself (Lokasenna 9) Loki became a jotun again once he murdered Baldur and was chained in Niflhel by the gods for it. We see him as “Uthgarlocus” in Saxo’s Danish History Book 8. His hair and beard

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